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Flea and Tick control for Kent, Ohio

Fleas and Ticks 

Fleas and ticks are two of the most frequent pet care concerns for Americans. Kent residents remember prevention is the best defense against these parasites. It is important to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of fleas and ticks so you can help your pets.

Fleas are the most common external parasite to plague pets. They are wingless insects that feed on blood and they can jump up to two feet high.

Fleas can live for as few as 2 weeks or as long as 12 months and during this time they can produce millions of offspring.

Pets and Fleas

Symptoms of dogs with fleas.

Fleas are most commonly noticed on a dog’s belly, the base of the tail and the head. Common symptoms of fleas on dogs are:

  • Flea dirt in a dog’s coat that looks like a small dark grains of sand
  • Eggs that look like tiny white grains
  • Allergic dermatitis
  • Excessive scratching or biting at skin
  • Hair loss
  • Scabs and hot spots
  • Pale gums
  • Tapeworms

Symptom cats have of fleas

If you see your cat scratching often then invest in a fine tooth comb and run it through their fur. Pay attention to the neck and the base of the tail when looking for the fleas.

  • Flea dirt in a dog’s coat that looks like a small dark grains of sand
  • Flea eggs that look like tiny white grains
  • Itchy and irritated skin
  • Excessive scratching
  • Chewing and licking
  • Hair loss
  • Tapeworms
  • Pale lips or gums

The Causes of Fleas

  • Fleas are easily brought in from the outside.
  • Fleas thrive in warm and humid climates at temperatures of 65 to 80 degrees.
  • Adult fleas spend most of their lives on pets laying eggs in the fur.
  • These eggs drop out everywhere and hatch into new adult fleas. Then in turn find their living host either human or animal.

Flea facts

  • Fleas can consume 15 times their own body weight in blood, which causes anemia or a significant amount of blood loss over time.
  • This is especially problematic in young puppies or kittens. When an inadequate number of red blood cells can be life threatening to your pet.
  • Some pets have a sensitivity to the saliva of fleas, which can cause an allergic reaction known as flea allergy dermatitis.

Flea treatments

Consult your local Kent area vet if you suspect your pet has fleas. It is important that all of your pets are treated for fleas and that the environment is treated as well. Once your vet confirms fleas, a treatment plan may include the following:

  • Topical or oral treatment on the pet
  • Thorough cleaning of your home including carpets, rugs, bedding and upholstery. Severe cases may require using a spray or a fogger in the home.
  • Lawn treatments will be needed so your pet will not keep getting re-infected every time it goes outside.

Flea Prevention

  • Use a flea comb on your pet and wash their bedding once a week.
  • Keep the outside of your house free of organic debris, such as rake clippings and leaves, and always remember that fleas like to hide in dark, moist, shady areas.
  • The best prevention is to keep regular lawn treatments applied outside during flea season.

 

Ticks

Ticks are parasites that feed on the blood of unlucky animals, such as cats and dogs. Like mites and spiders, ticks are arachnids. Although their presence may not even be noticed by a host, ticks can transmit many diseases.


Tick Transmission

  • Most species of ticks require blood meals from a host for its survival.
  • Ticks bury their head into a host when they bite and then gorge themselves on blood.
  • Ticks tend to be most active in late spring and summer and live in brush or grass, where they can attach to a host. Which makes cats and dogs a prime candidate.
  • Can be transferred from pets coming into the household from outside.
  • Ticks prefer to attach close to the head, neck, ears or feet, but can be found elsewhere also.
  • Ticks are particularly prominent in warm climates and certain wooded areas of the Northeast.

How do I find out if my pet has ticks?

  • Most ticks are visible by eye. Ticks are often the size of a pinhead before they bite, and are not noticed until they swell with blood.
  • While these parasites rarely cause obvious discomfort, it is a good idea to check your pet often if you live in an area where ticks are prevalent.
  • Run your hands carefully over your pet every time he comes inside. Especially check inside and around the ears, head and feet.

Complications that can be associated with ticks

  • Blood loss
  • Anemia
  • Tick paralysis
  • Skin irritation and infection
  • Lyme Disease
    • Lyme disease is an infection than can affect humans, dogs, and cats.
    • Its primary carrier is the deer tick. They can attach to a dog or human and transmit the bacteria that cause the disease.
    • Signs of Lyme disease include depression, swelling of the lymph nodes, loss of appetite, fever, swollen, painful joints and even kidney failure.
    • Lyme disease is mostly effective treated with antibiotics.
    • With prompt and proper treatment, your pet’s condition should start to improve within a couple of days.

 

Tick treatment

If you do find a tick on your pet, it is important to take care when preforming the removal. Any contact with the tick’s blood can potentially transmit the infection to your pet or even to you. Prompt removal is necessary by following these step-by-step tick removal instructions:

Step 1: Preparation

  • Put on latex gloves so you’ll never have direct contact with the tick or your pet’s infected area.
  • Because throwing the tick in the trash or flushing it down the toilet will not kill it, you should prepare a  jar containing rubbing alcohol to put a tick in after removal. This allows you to hold it for veterinary testing.
  • If possible find a partner to help you distract and comfort your pet and hold them still during removal.

Step 2: Remove

  • Using a pair of tweezers, grab the tick as close to the animals skin as possible.
  • Pull straight upwards with steady, even pressure and place the tick in your jar.
  • Don't twist or jerk on the tick. This may leave parts embedded in your pet, or cause the tick to regurgitate ineffective fluids.
  • Do not squeeze or smash the body of the tick, because its fluids may contain infection.

Step 3: Disinfect & watch

  • Disinfect the bite area and wash your hands with soap and water immediately, even though you were wearing gloves.
  • Sterilize your tweezers with alcohol or discard them.
  • Monitor the bite area over the next few weeks for any signs of infection, look for redness or inflammation.
  • If infection occur bring your pet and your jarred tick to your vet.

Tick prevention

  • Many products on the market that treat fleas also kill ticks. Speak to your vet about the best product.
  • Ensure a tick-free lawn by mowing it regularly, removing tall weeds and making it inhospitable. Prevention is key and regular lawn treatments applied outside during tick season is a great prevention also.

 

Ready to find out more about flea and tick control?

Call Akron Canton Lawn Care Now for your Free Estimate on any of our lawn care services
(330) 933-2222 or click the Contact Us button to send us an email.